5.
RE-SCREEN AND AUDIT. RE-MEASURE THE EMISSION READINGS
The leak detection
camera can be used to
highlight any initial
problems after start-up. Normal practice, is to periodically rescreen and remeasure the emissions. Where customers have their own in house
monitoring teams, the
process and readings
can be audited.
 
 
 
 
 
4.
REPAIR, REPLACE,
OVERHAUL
Where possible
components are
repaired on-line,
through ‘nipping’ up
or retightening. Depending on the
work load during a
shutdown, a program
of equipment overhaul, replacement or repair can be drawn up for areas of concern.
 
 
 
 
 
3.
RECORD EMISSIONS
IN THE DATABASE,
CORRELATE VALUES
TO PLANT LEAKAGE,
REPORT FINDINGS
The components are
monitored with TVA
measuring equipment
or the plant is
screened using a leak
detection camera. Readings are recorded
in our EMD software
system. The results
are analysed to
establish a repair
program. Plant leakage correlation and monitoring
analysis reports are
generated.
 
 
 
 
 
2.
TAG COMPONENTS IN LINE WITH THE P&ID NUMBERS, MODIFY THE LINE DRAWINGS
IF NECESSARY
Using the information
taken from the process
drawings, an
identification tag is
placed on the
corresponding valve. Notes are taken as to the safety requirements and
position of each piece
of equipment and any
necessary changes are made to the process drawings. A monitoring route is then devised to
provide a continuous
trial.
 
 
 
 
 
LDAR Envolve logo
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1.
IDENTIFY PROCESS LINES AND
COMPONENTS
The process line
diagrams are studied
to compile a list of parts and components that need monitoring. Each component is logged and recorded onto a work list
for future screening. Utilisation of the line
drawings allows a safe low of work during monitoring.
 
 
 
 
 
monitoring leaks
LDAR Envolve environmental solutions